Tuesday, July 29, 2014

"Revisiting Ludlow: 1914/2014."



A Special One-Day Colloquium, October, 3, 2014, at the SF State University Campus

"Revisiting Ludlow: Its Enduring Legacy"

This year marks the hundredth anniversary of the Ludlow massacre, one of the most violent conflicts in American labor history. A politicized site of
memory, Ludlow brings attention to immigrant subjectivities, working class consciousness and interethnic solidarity, while it generates interest in
its resonance for the contemporary labor movement. The events surrounding the strike and the families of the strikers at Ludlow attract the interest of historians, archaeologists, journalists, poets and writers exploring social memory and
its politics, the literary representation of the past, academic activism, public scholarship, and labor, ethnic and gender history. Local populations
and organized labor annually honor the memory of those miners, women and children killed in the massacre.

To honor this special anniversary of the Ludlow massacre of 1914, the Center for Modern Greek Studies at San Francisco State University will host the colloquium, "Revisiting Ludlow: 1914/2014." The colloquium brings together scholars, artists, journalists, researchers and museum curators with the aim of furthering the conversation about the scholarly and political significance of this seminal event. Writers with a distinguished record of work on Ludlow will introduce fresh perspectives and exchange ideas with scholars who are engaging with the subject for the first time. The colloquium provides a critical forum to present new scholarship and to revisit seminal texts on Ludlow. The aim is to promote cross-fertilization across genres and disciplines to further our understanding of Ludlow in relation to material culture, ethnicity, transnationalism, usable pasts, women's activism, academic politics, and the intersections of historical facts and fiction.

Participants include: writer and retired Professor of English, San Francisco Art Institute, Zeese Papanikolas; poet and Professor of English, David Mason, University of Colorado; historian, Professor Thomas Andrews, University of
Colorado; journalist Scott Martelle; Director of Labor Archives and Research at SF State, Catherine Powell; archaeologist and Professor of Art History, Kostis Kourelis, Franklin and Marshall College; and the two co-organizers of the
event, Director of the Center for Modern Greek Studies at SF State, Professor Martha Klironomos, and Greek American Studies scholar, Professor Yiorgos Anagnostou, Ohio State University.

The event is scheduled for October 3, 2014, at the SFSU campus, room HUM 587, 10 am – 4 pm.

For additional information, please contact Martha Klironomos (mkliro@sfsu.edu) or Yiorgos Anagnostou (anagnostou.1@osu.edu).

Please check the Center for Modern Greek Studies' website for updates: moderngreekstudies.sfsu.edu

This event is being made possible by the generous support of the College of Liberal and Creative Arts and the Center for Modern Greek Studies at SF State University.

It is also co-sponsored by the Departments of History, Humanities, Labor Archives and the American Studies program at San Francisco State
University.



Sunday, July 13, 2014

Spaces of Greek America



National food hits in the multicultural agora coexisting 
(Burlingame, CA, 2014)

For a cultural commentary on U.S. Greek yoghurt (in Greek and English) see,
 http://www.newdiaspora.com/im-greek-therefore-im-yogurt/



Wednesday, July 9, 2014

Golden Dawn in NYC – a short film and a response


"The film offers an in-depth look at what the Greek community in New York City is thinking and doing about the rise in Greece of one of the most virulent neo-Nazi parties in Europe, Golden Dawn. Polls indicate that Golden Dawn has grown into Greece’s third largest political party since the 2008 economic crisis. Filmmaker Richard Ledes decided to find out what the Greeks of New York City thought about the extraordinary rise of the party. Ledes places Golden Dawn in the context of the price America has paid previously for complacency in the face of the rise of Nazism in Europe."

See, http://www.pappaspost.com/award-winning-filmmaker-richard-ledes-releases-short-film-greek-neo-nazi-partys-activities-nyc/

And the GD response:

"Golden Dawn witch hunt targets members of the Greek-American community"

"A witch-hunt with a chiefly anti-Marxist slant has been launched by the New York arm of Golden Dawn against Greek expat professors, luminaries, activists of the American left, as well as other distinguished members of the Greek-American community. In an act of ‘retaliation’, as they themselves called it, against the ‘criminals’ and their ‘conspiracy’, the Greek-American Golden Dawn published personal details, phone numbers and addresses of whomever they put in their sights.

According to the post on their website, the neo-fascists decided to target the particular Greeks and Greek-Americans because they ‘dared’ to give their opinions about Golden Dawn in the documentary, “Golden Dawn, NYC.” They dub it, ‘a propaganda film against Golden Dawn pretending to be a documentary’ and attack all those who speak against the group in it. They don’t restrict themselves to slander however. They proceed to publish personal details, asking that their readers call them and… take to task all those who dared speak out."

See, http://www.thepressproject.net/article/64524/Golden-Dawn-witch-hunt-targets-members-of-the-Greek-American-community


Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Spaces of Greek America _ "Get your Greeks on Route 66" – Text by Lamprini C. Thoma, Photos by Nickos Ventouras



"Old Route 66 passed through Santa Fe, the capital of New Mexico, where you cannot miss Evangelo's Bar. It has a big neon sign featuring the Greek flag and the face of a young American soldier, a cigarette between his lips and a determined stare. It's a picture familiar from numerous reproductions, from LIFE magazine to a recent memorial stamp - the famous photo taken by world class photographer Eugene Smith in 1944 that became the unofficial icon of the American ‘unknown soldier’. Entering the bar, you will soon learn that the iconic American soldier was in fact Greek; he managed to get American citizenship only several years after the war. This little bar, considered one of the best live music spots in Santa Fe, was his way of earning his living and is now in the hands of one of his three sons, Nick.Old Route 66 passed through Santa Fe, the capital of New Mexico, where you cannot miss Evangelo's Bar. It has a big neon sign featuring the Greek flag and the face of a young American soldier, a cigarette between his lips and a determined stare. It's a picture familiar from numerous reproductions, from LIFE magazine to a recent memorial stamp - the famous photo taken by world class photographer Eugene Smith in 1944 that became the unofficial icon of the American ‘unknown soldier’. Entering the bar, you will soon learn that the iconic American soldier was in fact Greek; he managed to get American citizenship only several years after the war. This little bar, considered one of the best live music spots in Santa Fe, was his way of earning his living and is now in the hands of one of his three sons, ..."



There was an error in this gadget